Maryland’s State Partnership Celebration of EMS for Children Day, 2019

Maryland held an EMS award ceremony during EMS Week (May 19–25) on May 22, 2019, a day also recognized statewide and nationally as EMS for Children Day. Maryland Lt. Governor Boyd K. Rutherford joined the celebration and presented two proclamations: one recognizing EMS Week and another naming May 22 as EMS for Children Day. The Stars of Life (given for an outstanding rescue under extreme circumstances) and Right Care When It Counts award winners were selected by a statewide committee of career, volunteer, and commercial EMS clinicians, after being nominated by peers or a member of the public.

The Right Care When it Counts award is sponsored by the Maryland EMS for Children State Partnership and recognizes children/youth in the state who have demonstrated Steps to Take in an Emergency or Ways to be Better Prepared for an Emergency in the prior calendar year. Ongoing for 16 years, six young heroes received the Right Care When It Counts awards this year for bravely taking action to help someone in need. The Maryland Family Advisory Network (FAN) Chair Mary Ellen Wilson led the call for nominations and the review process. Listed below are five of the honoree’s stories (not all pictured).

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Pictured L-R: Clay Stamp, EMS Board, Cynthia Wright- Johnson, Director for the MD EMSC Program; Amara Monroe; Adam Miller, FF/ NRP; Dr. Jennifer Anders, Associate State EMS Medical Director for Pediatrics; Dr. Ted Delbridge, MIEMSS Director.

Amara Monroe

While home with her grandmother, Amara witnessed her grandmother fall down the steps. She immediately recognized the extent of the emergency and called 9-1-1. She was able to provide needed information for help to be dispatched to her grandmother. Amara then proceeded to a neighbor’s house in order to get additional adult help to her grandmother’s side. The neighbor gave further information to the dispatcher and the call was upgraded. Amara gave the EMS crew the full story of what had occurred which greatly helped with medical treatment. The patient received prompt care and attention due to Amara’s ability to recognize the emergency, activate the EMS system by calling 9-1-1 and stay calm at a critical time. Amara bravely made the right call for help and made a difference during this frightening incident.

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Pictured L-R: Clay Stamp, EMS Board, Cynthia Wright- Johnson, Director for the MD EMSC Program; Taurain L. Jones-Duke; Dr. Jennifer Anders, Associate State EMS Medical Director for Pediatrics; Dr. Ted Delbridge, MIEMSS Director.

Taurian L. Jones-Duke

With his mom and dad at work and schools closed due to icy conditions, sixteen year old Taurian Jones-Duke knew it was his job to keep an eye on his sister and little brother. They were upstairs in the kitchen, joking, and cooking something for lunch. Suddenly he heard some popping sounds and smelled smoke, which instantly concerned him. Seconds later he heard his sister scream and the smoke detector went off. Taurian sprinted upstairs to find a smoke filled kitchen with flames shooting out of a cooking pan. He moved his sister and little brother aside and instructed them to get out of the house right away. Taurian grabbed a pot holder to lift the pan off the stovetop. As he turned toward the sink, a strong wind rushed through the open door his siblings had just exited, splashing the boiling grease onto him and the floor. Taurian sustained deep third degree burns and was transported to the Pediatric Burn Center at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Despite all the pain and surgeries Taurian had to endure, he would do it over again to protect his brother and sister.

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Pictured L-R: Clay Stamp, EMS Board, Cynthia Wright- Johnson, Director for the MD EMSC Program; James “Wyatt” Toulson; Dr. Jennifer Anders, Associate State EMS Medical Director for Pediatrics; Dr. Ted Delbridge, MIEMSS Director.

James “Wyatt” Toulson

Early on Sunday, April 8, 2018 Wyatt and his father, who is a Firefighter/ Paramedic and a tow truck driver, went to the middle of New York State to tow a truck for a friend. Wyatt often rides with his dad when towing vehicles. As his father finished the tow and secured the truck to return home, he caught his right hand between two moving pieces of the truck, causing a crush injury and partial amputation of two of his fingers. Wyatt immediately grabbed towels from the truck, while his father called 9-1-1. After giving his father the towels Wyatt put the rest of the equipment back in the truck, secured and locked it, while constantly checking to make sure his dad was okay. He picked up the glove with the tip of the fingers and gave it to the EMS clinicians to take with them to hospital. As the ambulance crew was loading his father, he called his aunt, a nurse/ paramedic, and very calmly stated that “We have a problem, dad has cut his fingers and may need stitches”. He continued to periodically relay information to his aunt, remaining calm the entire time. His father required emergency surgery to repair his partially amputated finger and de-gloved finger. Wyatt remained with his dad, keeping him calm and reassured. Once his father got home, Wyatt was quick to offer to help change dressings or do whatever else he could do to help. Wyatt’s quick thinking and actions likely saved his father from further injury.

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Anders, Associate State EMS Medical Director for Pediatrics; Dr. Ted Delbridge, MIEMSS Director.

LaTrelle Wiggins

Last December, nine year old LaTrelle was the only other student in the room with his teacher at the Mt. Hope/ Nanjemoy Elementary School in Southern Maryland when one of his classmates had a seizure. While his teacher assisted the student, LaTrelle was asked to go find another teacher to help. LaTrelle walked across the hall and loudly and clearly asked for help. He led the other teacher to his classroom to assist in providing care to his friend. LaTrelle remained calm understanding how important it was to help his teacher and his friend, and to keep himself safe in a stressful situation.

Gabrielle Keener

On the evening of January 20, 2018, 12 year old Gabrielle (not pictured) called 9-1-1 to report that her grandfather was having trouble breathing. Based upon a clear description of the problem, units from Prince Georges County EMS were dispatched. Upon arrival, the EMS clinicians found an unresponsive male with a pulse. Gabrielle was the only one on the scene and was able to provide pertinent information about her grandfather to the crew. Gabrielle remained calm during this stressful event. Her quick thinking and fast actions allowed for the medics to assess and treat her grandfather. He ultimately went into cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts were administered. He regained his pulse and was transported to the hospital. Although he did not survive post arrest, Gabrielle was recognized for her quick thinking and heroism during this difficult time.

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